Intangible Turning Tangible - Flying High

Intangible Turning Tangible - Flying High

“Le Penseur” by Émile Louis Picault (1833-1915)

 Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people”.
Such pearl of wisdom, passed on to us by Eleanor Roosevelt, contains in a nutshell Picault’s essential theory eminently expressed in his true-to-life statue “Le Penseur” (i.e., “The Thinker”).
This discerning artist’s accomplished touch succeeded in rendering all of the emotional and physical effort the thinking process generally demands.
The slight furrows on the youth’s forehead combined with his deeply meditative facial traits impart to his overall expression a unique and faithful representation of what serious and in-depth reflection habitually exacts, especially in the strenuous attempt to find a solution to some overly intricate issue.

The fingers of the youth’s left hand are slightly touching his forehead – again – to clearly signify the effortful mental exertion required by any and all earnest train of thought.
The message written on the tablet held by this young intellectual reveals the author’s initial postulation: “C’est sur les hauts sommets que le penseur médite” (i.e., “The thinker meditates on the highest of summits”).

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Intangible Turning Tangible - A Flicker of Hope

Intangible Turning Tangible - A Flicker of Hope

Some of the most meaningful works of art have been occasionally created by the minds of ingenious, albeit anonymous artists or craftsmen. 
This is surely the case of a jar with a bronze lid, crafted by an anonymous artisan, or perhaps an artist, who was surely a dreamer with a fanciful imagination. Such artisan was inspired to transform a simple brick – salvaged from the wrecks of the House of Commons – into a jar with a bronze lid. 
The seal adorning one of the sides of the jar represents Saint George, Patron Saint of England, as a symbol of special protection, hope and ultimate victory over the “big bad dragon”. 
While Westminster Hall was rescued from the blaze – in view of its historical meaning – the House of Commons did not fare as well. 

The artisan being unknown, we are left with the stimulating task of guessing, or of drawing our own conclusions as to the true motivations that left us with this small, but effective, symbol of hopefulness (or at least, this is one of the many likely or subjective interpretations): life goes on, even under the form of a humble brick, which destiny was to be transformed by human events into an ornament for a mantlepiece, a small and perhaps, even seemingly superfluous object; and yet, this object is an incisive reminder that life goes on, must always be respected and that, notwithstanding man’s folly, it always has the last word. 

This particular jar represents in its simple lines how creativity, originality and ingenuity may create something out of a mere “nothing”.

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Intangible Turning Tangible - Thoughts in Chiaroscuro

Intangible Turning Tangible - Thoughts in Chiaroscuro

“The Supper at Emmaus” (1606) by Caravaggio

Caravaggio baffles with the predominant darkness (i.e., scuro) of the contours in this warm and intimate chiaroscuro tableau that captures a very special and intimate moment: a dinner in the life of the Resurrected Christ after his encounter with two of his disciples – who had not recognized him – on the way to Emmaus.

The lighter effects (i.e., chiaro) put the focus on the three table mates, the language of the hands of each commensal and the single expressions.
Christ’s lifted hand is the characteristic gesture of a teacher who is instructing and awakening the attention of his pupils or even reprimanding them.
The two disciples’ undivided and fervent attention may be clearly evinced by the position of their leaning bodies towards the speaker, while their evident surprise may be deduced by the left hand of one disciple’s clutching the table, and the open left hand of the other.
The demeanor of both expresses momentary disbelief, confusion and recognition of the Master – at last – as He is blessing the bread; a gesture so uniquely peculiar to Jesus such to cause his identity to be finally and unequivocally revealed.

Teaching and learning are two of the most important processes that accompany man throughout his entire life.
Both processes occur in all walks of life, although some occupations require lifelong study and commitment and this is the case for the legal profession.

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Intangible Turning Tangible - Labyrinths and Coils

Intangible Turning Tangible - Labyrinths and Coils

“Daidalos” by Louis Valentin Robert

Daedaleus, whose name is generally coupled with his son’s name, Icarus, was one of the greatest craftsmen of his times and perhaps of all times, if it’s true that to every myth there is always a kernel of veracity.
The reason he was requested to build the Labyrinth was to avoid that the Minotaur (monstrous half-bull and half-human creature) could escape.
King Minos, who was especially notorious for his ingratitude, instead of thanking him for having built the Labyrinth, thought to imprison Daedalus, along with his son Icarus, so that he could never reveal the secret of how the maze was built.

Daedalus being the genius and free spirit he was, could not be imprisoned for too long and found a way to escape: of course, we could not expect any lesser exploit from the greatest craftsman ever.

He built wings for himself and for his son. The wings were a great success as they actually allowed both, father and son, to fly and consequently escape.
The rest of the story we all know is that, since Icarus did not heed his father’s advice, he flew too close to the sun and his beautiful wings made of wax melted, leaving him to plummet into the Aegean, with consequences that may be easily guessed.
There are always two sides to every story and the ingenious mind is no exception.
Daedalus did not only have a prodigious mind but he also had the necessary talent and craftsmanship that allowed him to turn his ideas into concrete forms.

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Intangible Turning Tangible - Knowledge Inside

Intangible Turning Tangible - Knowledge Inside

“Norse Warrior and His Son” – Bronze Sculpture by Emile Laporte – (French, 1858-1907)

The Mentor
Very few are endowed with the rare gift of innate knowledge, the rest of us require someone to guide and show us the way in all facets of our lives.
Teaching starts at home, from our earliest childhood until we reach adulthood and beyond.
While our first steps are most likely to be encouraged by our mothers, our fathers play an equally important role.
Both have the precise duty to help us become full-fledged adults and honest citizens whose main aspiration should be to help society, and the world, become a “better place” also thanks to our personal contribution.

The message contained in this life-like work of art clearly conveys the strong bond in this father-and-son relationship.
The father is the hardy warrior: a full-fledged adult whose demeanor exudes strength, pride and courage and that unique self-assurance that only matures after many victorious battles.
His right arm is uplifted with his index finger pointing towards a faraway point, which may be a specific target or some strategic advice he is sharing with the young future warrior he is trying to forge.

The son’s attentive listening denotes the latter’s filial devotion along with a respectful and obedient attitude towards his father’s teachings, while the deep affection between the two is almost palpable.
The sculptor skillfully caught the essence of this double link between this father and his son.

A link in which the two roles are well defined: the father does not merely epitomize a father’s protective and duty-bound instinct towards his child, but in this instance, the parent is also playing the role of mentor to his son, as he is evidently teaching the youth the art of warfare, (as a vital survival technique), or the so-called “tricks of the trade”, which were crucial then and are just as fundamental nowadays.

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Intangible Turning Tangible - Idea Spawned

Intangible Turning Tangible - Idea Spawned

“La Pensée” (“The Thought”) by Émile Louis Picault

Ideas may be either the natural children of genius and creativity, or the offshoot of intense brainstorming, or even an urgent response to collective needs (whether these be conscious or not).

The artist’s sculpting skill masterfully embodies the birth of knowledge being delivered from the rock, with wings spread out and, just as the arrow, ready to take a heaven-bound flight, soaring towards the utter stretches of human science, as the torch of knowledge – the legacy of learning and cognizance come down to us from our ancestors through papyruses, parchments and books – which has been burning since the mists of time, and will continue doing so throughout the ages, its being one of the most fervent and natural quests of the human spirit.

Consultancy as the living upshot of an idea represents today the highest standard of professional and specialized advice at the service of society, based on extensive and in-depth knowledge of the law, expertise, know-how and applied skills combined with the highest moral and ethical standards. 

Ideas shape peoples, worlds and history.
They shape us, as we go along, through a self-catalyzed thought-generating process that expands in as many directions as our interests, motivations, consciousness and will shall allow.

“Coral and Doubts” by Jacques Antoine Théodore Coinchon

This bronze masterpiece includes coral (one of the unsolved quandaries ever since the days of Aristotle: “is coral an animal or a plant”?). Aristotle did eventually classify coral as a hybridization of “plant-animals” he named “zoophyta”, while this superb work of art means to remind...

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Intangible Turning Tangible - The Equilibrist

Intangible Turning Tangible - The Equilibrist

What Does It Take To Be an Equilibrist?
Balance, of course, first and foremost.

Balance may be either inborn emotional, spiritual and physical equilibrium, as the result of natural characteristics and/or personal inner as well as physical strength, or may be acquired by means of sheer willpower and constant and painstaking exercise, combined with the steadfast intention to reach a particular goal, even when such goal is arduous or nearly impossible.

Equilibrium in a balancing act demands therefore ability, talent, courage, physical and emotional strength, willpower and poise even when faced with the risk of losing such balance and in that case, the true equilibrist may even falter but shall continue striving to reach the other end of the rope, without getting discouraged.
Balance under all respects is also required in the professional arena, as one of its most salient features.
In the legal profession, consultants may be faced with very delicate and sensitive situations where they might have to deal with conflicting issues which may derive from a number of internal and/or external causes.

In order to perform a perfect “balancing act” in such kinds of circumstances, the true professional, has to put to use all of his good judgment, keenest discernment and keep his/her emotional and mental equilibrium, which means a clear head, in order to be able to judiciously and adroitly weigh all pros and cons and keep everything under control. 

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